Crisis Hotline (800) 317-0708

Annual Report - FY17

Annual Report Art Contest Winner

This year’s winner of the Community Mental Health for Central Michigan (CMHCM) Annual Report Art Contest is Jonathan Bailey from Osceola County. Mr. Bailey's art was selected by the CMHCM Consumer Action Committee from a number of entries. All the artists who participate in the contest currently receive or have received mental health services. We wish to express our appreciation to all who entered the contest and congratulate Mr. Bailey.

 

Mission, Vision, Values

Mission

To promote community inclusion and whole-person wellness through provision of comprehensive and quality integrated services to individuals with a mental illness, developmental disability, and/or substance use disorder.

Vision

Communities where all individuals experience fulfilled lives.

Values

  • The dignity and worth of each individual
  • Consumer involvement and empowerment                                   
  • Person-centered planning and self-determination
  • Trauma-informed care
  • Behavioral and physical health integration
  • Prevention and wellness
  • Early intervention       
  • Diversity
  • Advocacy and public education
  • Community inclusion
  • Responsiveness to local community needs
  • High quality services that are affordable and accessible
  • Creativity, innovation, and evidence-based practices
  • Competent staff and providers
  • Continuous quality improvement
  • Participative management
  • Ethical practices
  • Efficient utilization of resources
  • Fiscal integrity

Annual Message

The CMHCM Board and staff are pleased to share with you our 2017 Annual Report. CMHCM provided a wide array of services to help the most vulnerable persons in our communities experience fulfilled lives. New approaches to treatment were adopted including Cognitive Enhancement Therapy which significantly increased consumer engagement in the Assertive Community Treatment program for adults. Early intervention treatment was also implemented to minimize the long-term damage typically caused by first episode psychosis.

CMHCM’s consumers benefit from local partnerships with human services, law enforcement, courts, schools, physical health sector, and non-profit entities that provide interventions, and supports. Tragic events around the country underscore the benefit of robust coordination with community partners. The more local partners collaborate, the stronger and healthier our communities become through our combined and complementary efforts. 

CMHCM is investing in more resources to enhance services to children recognizing that early intervention may reduce a lifetime of struggle. CMHCM enrolled in the University of Michigan TRAILS program that couples clinicians and teachers in applying mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy principles at school. All six counties were approved by MDHHS to establish Children’s Therapeutic Foster Care services for children with serious emotional disturbance. CMHCM was also selected in a highly competitive process for participation in the Child Parent Psychotherapy Learning Collaborative which enhances early intervention services to children having experienced trauma before the age of five. Other children’s services that were expanded includes Baby Court, Multi-Systemic Treatment team, and Youth Intervention Specialist services.  Enrollment in autism services expanded to include adults through age 21 and increased by over 50 percent. 

The strong advocacy efforts of our crisis unit led to a number of statewide psychiatric inpatient systems improvement initiatives. Access to medication assisted therapy was brought onsite to help battle the opioid epidemic. Newly acquired daily physical health integration data complemented CMHCM services by furthering the focus on whole-person wellness. By engaging with research organizations, health systems, and practitioners, we explored and identified new ways of bringing value to our communities.

Our community impact in FY17 is only made possible by the selfless support from all of our staff, partners, and community stakeholders. Thank you!

The CMHCM Board and staff are pleased to share with you our 2017 Annual Report. CMHCM provided a wide array of services to help the most vulnerable persons in our communities experience fulfilled lives. New approaches to treatment were adopted including Cognitive Enhancement Therapy which significantly increased consumer engagement in the Assertive Community Treatment program for adults. Early intervention treatment was also implemented to minimize the long-term damage typically caused by first episode psychosis.

CMHCM’s consumers benefit from local partnerships with human services, law enforcement, courts, schools, physical health sector, and non-profit entities that provide interventions, and supports. Tragic events around the country underscore the benefit of robust coordination with community partners. The more local partners collaborate, the stronger and healthier our communities become through our combined and complementary efforts. 

CMHCM is investing in more resources to enhance services to children recognizing that early intervention may reduce a lifetime of struggle. CMHCM enrolled in the University of Michigan TRAILS program that couples clinicians and teachers in applying mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy principles at school. All six counties were approved by MDHHS to establish Children’s Therapeutic Foster Care services for children with serious emotional disturbance. CMHCM was also selected in a highly competitive process for participation in the Child Parent Psychotherapy Learning Collaborative which enhances early intervention services to children having experienced trauma before the age of five. Other children’s services that were expanded includes Baby Court, Multi-Systemic Treatment team, and Youth Intervention Specialist services.  Enrollment in autism services expanded to include adults through age 21 and increased by over 50 percent. 

The strong advocacy efforts of our crisis unit led to a number of statewide psychiatric inpatient systems improvement initiatives. Access to medication assisted therapy was brought onsite to help battle the opioid epidemic. Newly acquired daily physical health integration data complemented CMHCM services by furthering the focus on whole-person wellness. By engaging with research organizations, health systems, and practitioners, we explored and identified new ways of bringing value to our communities.

Our community impact in FY17 is only made possible by the selfless support from all of our staff, partners, and community stakeholders. Thank you!

Financial Report

CMHCM receives financial support from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

Revenue Table
Expenses Table
Pie Chart

Accomplishments

FY2017 By The Numbers

  • 1,445 crisis responses were provided to individuals experiencing a mental health crisis

  • 97 percent of persons discharged from inpatient settings were seen for follow-up treatment

  • 487 children and families received mental health services in their homes

  • 492 individuals are living in the community with residential treatment and supports

  • 159 individuals are utilizing self-determination arrangements to control individual budgets for their mental health services and supports to live the lives they want in the community

  • 132 persons with mental illness found successful job placements and 87 percent have retained their jobs during FY17

  • 6,210 plans were developed to assist individuals to live a fulfilled life while honoring their preferences, choices, and abilities

  • 211 individuals were diverted from jail to a mental health service

  • 152 individuals received a service while incarcerated

  • 215 individuals were trained in Mental Health First Aid

  • 326 occasions to raise awareness about mental health were given by staff to the community

  • 600 students received information on suicide prevention and depression

  • 500 students heard presentations on a variety of mental health topics to increase understanding and awareness and decrease stigma

  • 21 individuals graduated from Cognitive Enhancement Therapy

  • 149 individuals received Applied Behavioral Analysis Therapy

Individuals Served

Chart
Chart

Locations / Numbers

Clare County

789 North Clare Avenue

Harrison, MI 48625

989.539.2141

Gladwin County

655 East Cedar Street

Gladwin, MI 48624

989.426.9295

Isabella County

The George Rouman Center

301 South Crapo Street

Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858

989.772.5938

Summit Clubhouse

2120 East Remus Road

Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858

989.317.3330

Administrative Offices

The George Rouman Center

301 South Crapo Street, Suite 100

Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858

989.772.5938

Mecosta County

500 South Third Avenue

Big Rapids, MI 49307

231.796.5825

New Journey Clubhouse

405B South Third Avenue

Big Rapids, MI 49307

231.592.4654

Midland County

218 Fast Ice Drive

Midland, MI 48642

989.631.2320

Osceola County

4473 220th Avenue

Reed City, MI 49677

231.832.2247

 


 

24 Hour CRISIS Telephone

1.800.317.0708

Convenient Office Locations and Hours

All offices offer evening hours by appointment.

 

For those with hearing impairment, please call the Michigan Relay at 7-1-1.

Board of Directors



Clare County

Sandra Bristol
L. Joseph Phillips

 

Gladwin County

Sandra Aultman
Susan Svetcos

Isabella County

James Haton
Tobin Hope
Kerin Scanlon

Mecosta County

Constance Gibson
Linda Howard

Midland County

Richard Dolinski
Steve Glaser
Douglas Ward
Kim Wheeler

Osceola County

Roger Elkins
Kerry Green

 

Video Clip

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