Annual Report - FY 21

Annual Report Art Contest

This year’s winner of the Community Mental Health for Central Michigan (CMHCM) Annual Report Art Contest is Katie Moore.  Ms. Moore's art was selected by the CMHCM Consumer Action Committee from a number of entries. All the artists who participate in the contest currently receive or have received mental health services. We wish to express our appreciation to all who entered the contest and congratulate Katie.

Mission, Vision, Values

Our Mission

To promote community inclusion and whole-person wellness through comprehensive and quality integrated services to individuals with a serious emotional disturbance, intellectual/developmental disability, serious mental illness, or co-occurring substance use disorder.

Our Vision

Communities where all individuals experience fulfilled lives.

Values

  • The dignity and worth of each individual
  • Consumer involvement and empowerment                                   
  • Person-centered planning and self-determination
  • Trauma-informed care
  • Behavioral and physical health integration
  • Early intervention, prevention, and wellness
  • Diversity and community inclusion
  • Advocacy and public education
  • Responsiveness to local community needs
  • High quality services that are affordable and accessible
  • Creativity, innovation, and evidence-based practices
  • Competent staff and providers
  • Continuous quality improvement
  • Participative management
  • Ethical practices
  • Fiscal integrity and efficient utilization of resources

Annual Message

CMHCM presents its 2021 Annual Report with our deepest gratitude to our highly esteemed staff, provider network, community partners, and Board of Directors serving the counties of Clare, Gladwin, Isabella, Mecosta, Midland, and Osceola. The CMHCM Vision, ‘Communities where all individuals experience fulfilled lives,’ is achievable when the whole community shares in that responsibility. The 2021 Annual Report provides strong evidence of community partnerships that enhance the quality of life for central Michigan’s most vulnerable citizens.

During 2021, the prolonged effects of the pandemic exacerbated pre-existing workforce shortages and spotlighted behavioral workforce resiliency needs. Public policy flexibilities were coupled with federal COVID-19 funding to enhance staff recruitment, staff retention, and resiliency. Providers across our six counties were hit particularly hard and MDHHS enabled stability payments to support network adequacy. Many COVID-19 work accommodations originally established out of necessity have taken on a sense of permanency as consumers and staff realized the benefits of telehealth and the enhanced ability to balance work and life amidst ever changing public mandates. All the while, the public behavioral health system and its numerous local and state level supporters continued to advocate against state legislation that could undermine local control of public behavioral health and resources. Additionally, the availability of psychiatric inpatient beds hit critical lows in 2021.

In that challenging context, CMHCM aggressively worked to enhance our services to the community. CMHCM expanded Jail Diversion services to Clare, Gladwin, Isabella, Mecosta, and Osceola counties to strengthen law enforcement partnerships, improve community-based responses in diverting eligible individuals from custody and/or jail, and to provide linkages to community-based treatment and support services. Medical Assistants were brought on to increase RN capacity for expanded collaborative care and care management, and Benefits Eligibility Specialists were brought on to provide specialized support to consumers and case holders in accessing benefits for behavioral, physical, and social determinants of health.   

CMHCM also implemented change efforts in pursuit of a Certified Community Behavioral Health Center designation. Key areas of change included updated suicide assessment protocol, updated health assessment and outcomes tool, team-based care approach, dashboards for teams and integrated health initiatives, as well as same-day access and person-centered planning enhancements. CMHCM is proud to have also celebrated our 25th year as a nationally accredited behavioral health entity with The Joint Commission.

CMHCM invites you to enjoy and share the many successes in this report. As the safety net for public behavioral health in central Michigan, CMHCM and its partners are truly privileged to serve our communities. George Rouman, late CMHCM Executive Director for 40 years, said it best, “I cannot imagine a more satisfying career than the one I chose. The opportunity to help persons with debilitating mental illnesses and disabilities, the chance to work alongside creative and committed colleagues, the ability to make lifelong friendships, and the gratification of a career of service cannot be overstated.”

This year’s winner of the Community Mental Health for Central Michigan (CMHCM) Annual Report Art Contest is Katie Moore.  Ms. Moore's art was selected by the CMHCM Consumer Action Committee from a number of entries. All the artists who participate in the contest currently receive or have received mental health services. We wish to express our appreciation to all who entered the contest and congratulate Katie.

Our Mission

To promote community inclusion and whole-person wellness through comprehensive and quality integrated services to individuals with a serious emotional disturbance, intellectual/developmental disability, serious mental illness, or co-occurring substance use disorder.

Our Vision

Communities where all individuals experience fulfilled lives.

Values

  • The dignity and worth of each individual
  • Consumer involvement and empowerment                                   
  • Person-centered planning and self-determination
  • Trauma-informed care
  • Behavioral and physical health integration
  • Early intervention, prevention, and wellness
  • Diversity and community inclusion
  • Advocacy and public education
  • Responsiveness to local community needs
  • High quality services that are affordable and accessible
  • Creativity, innovation, and evidence-based practices
  • Competent staff and providers
  • Continuous quality improvement
  • Participative management
  • Ethical practices
  • Fiscal integrity and efficient utilization of resources

CMHCM presents its 2021 Annual Report with our deepest gratitude to our highly esteemed staff, provider network, community partners, and Board of Directors serving the counties of Clare, Gladwin, Isabella, Mecosta, Midland, and Osceola. The CMHCM Vision, ‘Communities where all individuals experience fulfilled lives,’ is achievable when the whole community shares in that responsibility. The 2021 Annual Report provides strong evidence of community partnerships that enhance the quality of life for central Michigan’s most vulnerable citizens.

During 2021, the prolonged effects of the pandemic exacerbated pre-existing workforce shortages and spotlighted behavioral workforce resiliency needs. Public policy flexibilities were coupled with federal COVID-19 funding to enhance staff recruitment, staff retention, and resiliency. Providers across our six counties were hit particularly hard and MDHHS enabled stability payments to support network adequacy. Many COVID-19 work accommodations originally established out of necessity have taken on a sense of permanency as consumers and staff realized the benefits of telehealth and the enhanced ability to balance work and life amidst ever changing public mandates. All the while, the public behavioral health system and its numerous local and state level supporters continued to advocate against state legislation that could undermine local control of public behavioral health and resources. Additionally, the availability of psychiatric inpatient beds hit critical lows in 2021.

In that challenging context, CMHCM aggressively worked to enhance our services to the community. CMHCM expanded Jail Diversion services to Clare, Gladwin, Isabella, Mecosta, and Osceola counties to strengthen law enforcement partnerships, improve community-based responses in diverting eligible individuals from custody and/or jail, and to provide linkages to community-based treatment and support services. Medical Assistants were brought on to increase RN capacity for expanded collaborative care and care management, and Benefits Eligibility Specialists were brought on to provide specialized support to consumers and case holders in accessing benefits for behavioral, physical, and social determinants of health.   

CMHCM also implemented change efforts in pursuit of a Certified Community Behavioral Health Center designation. Key areas of change included updated suicide assessment protocol, updated health assessment and outcomes tool, team-based care approach, dashboards for teams and integrated health initiatives, as well as same-day access and person-centered planning enhancements. CMHCM is proud to have also celebrated our 25th year as a nationally accredited behavioral health entity with The Joint Commission.

CMHCM invites you to enjoy and share the many successes in this report. As the safety net for public behavioral health in central Michigan, CMHCM and its partners are truly privileged to serve our communities. George Rouman, late CMHCM Executive Director for 40 years, said it best, “I cannot imagine a more satisfying career than the one I chose. The opportunity to help persons with debilitating mental illnesses and disabilities, the chance to work alongside creative and committed colleagues, the ability to make lifelong friendships, and the gratification of a career of service cannot be overstated.”

Financial Report

Individuals Served

Locations

CLARE COUNTY
789 North Clare Avenue
Harrison, MI 48625
989.539.2141

GLADWIN COUNTY
655 East Cedar Street
Gladwin, MI 48624
989.426.9295

ISABELLA COUNTY
The George Rouman Center
301 South Crapo Street
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858
989.772.5938

SUMMIT CLUBHOUSE
2120 East Remus Road
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858
989.317.3330

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES
The George Rouman Center
301 South Crapo Street, Suite 100
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858
989.772.5938

MECOSTA COUNTY
500 South Third Avenue
Big Rapids, MI 49307
231.796.5825

NEW JOURNEY CLUBHOUSE
405B South Third Avenue
Big Rapids, MI 49307
231.592.4654

MIDLAND COUNTY
218 Fast Ice Drive
Midland, MI 48642
989.631.2320

OSCEOLA COUNTY
4473 220th Avenue
Reed City, MI 49677
231.832.2247

CLARE COUNTY
789 North Clare Avenue
Harrison, MI 48625
989.539.2141

GLADWIN COUNTY
655 East Cedar Street
Gladwin, MI 48624
989.426.9295

ISABELLA COUNTY
The George Rouman Center
301 South Crapo Street
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858
989.772.5938

SUMMIT CLUBHOUSE
2120 East Remus Road
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858
989.317.3330

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES
The George Rouman Center
301 South Crapo Street, Suite 100
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858
989.772.5938

MECOSTA COUNTY
500 South Third Avenue
Big Rapids, MI 49307
231.796.5825

NEW JOURNEY CLUBHOUSE
405B South Third Avenue
Big Rapids, MI 49307
231.592.4654

MIDLAND COUNTY
218 Fast Ice Drive
Midland, MI 48642
989.631.2320

OSCEOLA COUNTY
4473 220th Avenue
Reed City, MI 49677
231.832.2247

Board of Directors

Clare County

Sandra Bristol
L. Joseph Phillips

Gladwin County

Susan Svetcos
Karen Moore


Isabella County

James Haton
Tobin Hope
Kerin Scanlon

 


Mecosta County

Linda Howard
Mary Olshewski


 


Midland County

Richard Dolinski
Steve Glaser
Annmarie Hawkins
Douglas Ward

Osceola County

Roger Elkins
Melissa King

County Achievements

  • Clare

    • Continued partnership with the Clare-Gladwin Regional Education Service District (CGRESD) occurred to provide mental health services in the schools through two Youth Intervention Specialists
    • Ongoing collaboration occurred with DHHS on consumer cases to provide collaborative care and to ensure that a coordinated effort was done for all consumer
    • Youth Mental Health First Aid training was provided to Clare DHHS to increase their understanding of mental health
    • CMHCM staff from Clare County participated as a member of the Trauma Awareness Steering Committee – a committee to increase trauma awareness in Clare County and provide educational resources for consumers on trauma
    • A jail liaison position was added to serve Clare County which provides mental health screening, treatments, crisis intervention, and group therapy
    • Continued participation has occurred as a member of and partner with the Recovery Court in Clare County
  • Gladwin

    • Beaverton School District continued a contract with CMHCM for provision of therapy services within their high school
    • The collaboration between DHHS and CMHCM continued to grow in FY21; educational opportunities with Youth Mental Health First Aid were completed
    • Gladwin county provided motivational interviewing training to DHHS staff to ensure that there is an increased focus on how to better engage the consumers that they serve
    • Gladwin staff has participated on a DHHS team to work to re-write the child abuse protocols for Gladwin county
    • Participation and growth of Baby Court programming occurred
    • Gladwin staff participated as a member of the community collaborative/sexual assault response team to help develop an improved protocol process for sexual assault survivors and to increase community partnerships
  • Isabella

    • School Safety Alliance (SSA) meetings were attended which includes school administrators, local police departments, the fire department, and central dispatch
    • Staff attended multiple meetings with the DHHS to provide input on quality improvement efforts relating to collaboration and coordination as well as to train DHHS staff on mental health related issues
    • Participation continued on the Isabella County Community Collaborative group
    • A monthly meeting was established with School Special Education staff which includes staff from the Special Education department, Tribal School, Probation, and DHHS to provide education and coordination of mental health related issues in this population
    • A partnership continued with MyMichigan Health to provide consumers with an after-hours crisis screening location in Isabella County
    • Numerous presentations were conducted to provide education on how to connect with consumers and community members during the pandemic
  • Midland

    • A partnership with Recovery Pathways continues within the Midland County location to provide medication assisted addiction treatment
    • Midland was selected as a pilot program for promoting access and continuity of care for children/youth with mental illness who are placed in juvenile detention centers through placing a CMHCM outpatient therapist at Midland’s Juvenile Care Center
    • Youth Intervention Specialist provided screening and referrals for any adolescent at risk of or using drugs or alcohol regardless of their insurance or ability to pay through a partnership with Midland Kids First and other community providers
    • MidMichigan Community Health Services (a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC)) is co-located within the Midland office to provide primary care services to consumers and the community
    • A Jail Liaison/Diversion Specialist was co-located at the Midland County jail to assist with pre- and post-booking diversions; this individual serves on all of Midland’s specialty/treatment courts including drug court and mental health court
    • Trainings on compassion fatigue, burnout, and healthy coping strategies/mental wellbeing in challenging times were presented to the community and community partners
  • Osceola

    • A Youth Intervention Specialist within Osceola County created a Mental Health Matters newsletter to be distributed to families through schools and Angels of Action
    • Staff are participating in the Mecosta-Osceola Early Childhood Wellness coalition with DHHS, the Health Department, Spectrum, and the SUD provider Ten16
    • A collaborative self-care group, called the Resilience Alliance, was formed to address secondary trauma for members of DHHS and CMHCM
    • The Osceola Community Foundation awarded $5,500 in flex funds for children with a serious emotional disturbance children in Wraparound services
    • Two Mental Health First Aid Trainings were conducted for Eagle Village staff, school administrators/staff, Youth Attention Center staff, DHHS staff and community members
    • A Jail Diversion Specialist was co-located in the Osceola County jail to assist with diversion efforts and to provide consultation for individuals within the jail system
  • Mecosta

    • A CMHCM staff was co-located in the Mecosta County jail to assist with diversion efforts as well as to complete assessments, offer group and individual counseling, and provide consultation to officers/medical providers
    • CMHCM provided autism/sensory bags for Mecosta County police vehicles
    • A Mental Health First Aid Training was completed for all Mecosta County law enforcement and first responders
    • Narcan kits were distributed along with educational materials to Ferris State University, the Health Department, and law enforcement to assist with opioid overdoses
    • The mental health awareness event, Walk-a-Mile, was held on May 17th at Hemlock Park for Mecosta County to raise awareness of mental health needs within the Mecosta community
    • A COVID-19 vaccination clinic was offered at CMHCM in partnership with the District Health Department

Clare County

Sandra Bristol
L. Joseph Phillips

Gladwin County

Susan Svetcos
Karen Moore


Isabella County

James Haton
Tobin Hope
Kerin Scanlon

 


Mecosta County

Linda Howard
Mary Olshewski


 


Midland County

Richard Dolinski
Steve Glaser
Annmarie Hawkins
Douglas Ward

Osceola County

Roger Elkins
Melissa King

  • Clare

    • Continued partnership with the Clare-Gladwin Regional Education Service District (CGRESD) occurred to provide mental health services in the schools through two Youth Intervention Specialists
    • Ongoing collaboration occurred with DHHS on consumer cases to provide collaborative care and to ensure that a coordinated effort was done for all consumer
    • Youth Mental Health First Aid training was provided to Clare DHHS to increase their understanding of mental health
    • CMHCM staff from Clare County participated as a member of the Trauma Awareness Steering Committee – a committee to increase trauma awareness in Clare County and provide educational resources for consumers on trauma
    • A jail liaison position was added to serve Clare County which provides mental health screening, treatments, crisis intervention, and group therapy
    • Continued participation has occurred as a member of and partner with the Recovery Court in Clare County
  • Gladwin

    • Beaverton School District continued a contract with CMHCM for provision of therapy services within their high school
    • The collaboration between DHHS and CMHCM continued to grow in FY21; educational opportunities with Youth Mental Health First Aid were completed
    • Gladwin county provided motivational interviewing training to DHHS staff to ensure that there is an increased focus on how to better engage the consumers that they serve
    • Gladwin staff has participated on a DHHS team to work to re-write the child abuse protocols for Gladwin county
    • Participation and growth of Baby Court programming occurred
    • Gladwin staff participated as a member of the community collaborative/sexual assault response team to help develop an improved protocol process for sexual assault survivors and to increase community partnerships
  • Isabella

    • School Safety Alliance (SSA) meetings were attended which includes school administrators, local police departments, the fire department, and central dispatch
    • Staff attended multiple meetings with the DHHS to provide input on quality improvement efforts relating to collaboration and coordination as well as to train DHHS staff on mental health related issues
    • Participation continued on the Isabella County Community Collaborative group
    • A monthly meeting was established with School Special Education staff which includes staff from the Special Education department, Tribal School, Probation, and DHHS to provide education and coordination of mental health related issues in this population
    • A partnership continued with MyMichigan Health to provide consumers with an after-hours crisis screening location in Isabella County
    • Numerous presentations were conducted to provide education on how to connect with consumers and community members during the pandemic
  • Midland

    • A partnership with Recovery Pathways continues within the Midland County location to provide medication assisted addiction treatment
    • Midland was selected as a pilot program for promoting access and continuity of care for children/youth with mental illness who are placed in juvenile detention centers through placing a CMHCM outpatient therapist at Midland’s Juvenile Care Center
    • Youth Intervention Specialist provided screening and referrals for any adolescent at risk of or using drugs or alcohol regardless of their insurance or ability to pay through a partnership with Midland Kids First and other community providers
    • MidMichigan Community Health Services (a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC)) is co-located within the Midland office to provide primary care services to consumers and the community
    • A Jail Liaison/Diversion Specialist was co-located at the Midland County jail to assist with pre- and post-booking diversions; this individual serves on all of Midland’s specialty/treatment courts including drug court and mental health court
    • Trainings on compassion fatigue, burnout, and healthy coping strategies/mental wellbeing in challenging times were presented to the community and community partners
  • Osceola

    • A Youth Intervention Specialist within Osceola County created a Mental Health Matters newsletter to be distributed to families through schools and Angels of Action
    • Staff are participating in the Mecosta-Osceola Early Childhood Wellness coalition with DHHS, the Health Department, Spectrum, and the SUD provider Ten16
    • A collaborative self-care group, called the Resilience Alliance, was formed to address secondary trauma for members of DHHS and CMHCM
    • The Osceola Community Foundation awarded $5,500 in flex funds for children with a serious emotional disturbance children in Wraparound services
    • Two Mental Health First Aid Trainings were conducted for Eagle Village staff, school administrators/staff, Youth Attention Center staff, DHHS staff and community members
    • A Jail Diversion Specialist was co-located in the Osceola County jail to assist with diversion efforts and to provide consultation for individuals within the jail system
  • Mecosta

    • A CMHCM staff was co-located in the Mecosta County jail to assist with diversion efforts as well as to complete assessments, offer group and individual counseling, and provide consultation to officers/medical providers
    • CMHCM provided autism/sensory bags for Mecosta County police vehicles
    • A Mental Health First Aid Training was completed for all Mecosta County law enforcement and first responders
    • Narcan kits were distributed along with educational materials to Ferris State University, the Health Department, and law enforcement to assist with opioid overdoses
    • The mental health awareness event, Walk-a-Mile, was held on May 17th at Hemlock Park for Mecosta County to raise awareness of mental health needs within the Mecosta community
    • A COVID-19 vaccination clinic was offered at CMHCM in partnership with the District Health Department
Accredited by
The Joint Commission National Quality Approval Logo
A Member of
Mid-State Health Network Logo
"My therapist. She helps me with my shame and guilt for my mental [health] issues. Does not judge me and helps me to be more positive about the progress I have and to set goals."
-Gladwin County